CFEH & OA NSW/ACT CPD

Learning for Vision - CFEH Education & Optometry NSW/ACT Online CPD

Welcome to a sensational new way to enhance your CPD learning experience, brought to you by the Centre for Eye Health and Optometry NSW/ACT.

The Centre for Eye Health (CFEH) and Optometry NSW/ACT have joined forces to offer Association members access to the vast library of CFEH Education videos, learning tools and resources at reduced prices. For more information, please visit the Referers section of the CFEH website.               

  • View the full CFEH Education 2018 CPD Catalogue
  • Click here to be taken to the CFEH Education website
  • To log in, use your OA NSW/ACT membership number as both username and password (beginning with a capital M)

Questions? Contact Karin on (02) 8115 0740 or via email by clicking here.


Learning for Vision Saturday Workshop (Super Sunday weekend)

Date Workshop
10/03/2018

Diagnostic Enigmas and How to Solve Them

This workshop uses an interactive problem-based approach to focus on improving diagnostic ability through the use of advanced imaging. Participants will work through supervised computer-based stations in small groups (5 or less) with ‘virtual patients’ accessing clinical data and imaging to diagnose and manage the cases presented. Key learnings and outcomes will be discussed for each case covering a range of clinically relevant anterior and posterior eye conditions. The workshop will use a team-based approach to increase participation, interest and engagement, as well as reinforcing the take home messages.


Learning for Vision 2018 Online Webinar Series (6:30pm, unless otherwise noted)

Date Webinars/Speakers/Links
13/02/2018

Electrophysiology 101 – What Every Optometrist Needs to Know LECTURE RUN

(Attendance at the live webinar will earn 2 face to face CPD points, and completion of the associated quiz will earn a further 1T face to face point.)

Dr Nagi Assaad, BSc (Med), MBBS MBiomedE, FRANZCO, and Michael Yapp, BOptom (Hons), MOptom, GradCertOcTher

Bio:

Dr Nagi Assaad is a consultant ophthalmic surgeon who practices in General Ophthalmology and Medical Retina. He completed medical school at the University of Sydney, where he received a number of undergraduate prizes and scholarships. During his medical degree he also completed a research degree in visual physiology. While working as a junior doctor, he completed a Master of Biomedical Engineering degree at the University of New South Wales, with a focus on advanced optics, ophthalmic technology and retinal protein structure.

He completed his specialist ophthalmology training at Price of Wales Hospital, Sydney, followed by a fellowship in Medical Retina and Uveitis at the internationally renowned Moorfields Eye Hospital, London. During the fellowship, he gained expertise in the latest treatments for macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and retinal vascular diseases, including retinal vein occlusions. He has extensive experience in retinal laser treatments and the use of intraocular injections (such as Lucentis and Avastin) for the management of retinal diseases including macular degeneration.  He has been involved in teaching medical students, optometry students and ophthalmology registrars throughout his career in ophthalmology. He is a Fellow of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

Michael Yapp received has B.Optom (Hons), M.Optom and GradCertOcTher from UNSW. He has worked in private practice, as a locum in around Australia and the UK, as a staff optometrist at UNSW, as the program manager for Luxottica’s charity program and at a corneal specialist ophthalmology practice. He is currently the chief staff optometrist at the Centre for Eye Health with a special interest in ocular imaging and glaucoma. He is passionate about contributing to both undergraduate and postgraduate optometric education and has been invited to speak in India and the US as well as around Australia. He has also contributed to articles in Ophthalmic and Physiological optics, Ophthalmic Epidemiology, Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness and Pharma.

Lecture Summary:

Ocular Electrophysiology encompasses a complex series of tests that are not part of routine clinical practice.  They can however provide critical clinical information in the diagnosis and management of a range of ocular conditions and presentations.  As a result, it is important that optometrists:

  • Are aware of the range of tests that are available and what parts of the visual system they test
  • Have an understanding of when it is appropriate to refer for them
  • Have a basic understanding of the results. 

The first half of this presentation covers these points with the second half providing case studies to show how the theory can be applied to clinical practice.

Learning Objectives:

  1. An improved understanding of the role of electrophysiology for optometric practice
  2. Enhanced knowledge of the role and interpretation of ocular electrophysiology tests
  3. An increased ability to utilise electrophysiology in the management of their patients
20/03/2018

The ABCs of Atypical Disc Shapes and Sizes LECTURE RUN

(Attendance at the live webinar will earn 2T face to face CPD points, and completion of the associated quiz will earn a further 1T face to face point.)

Jack Phu, BOptom (Hons.), BSc, MPH, FAAO

Bio:

Jack is Lead Clinician (Glaucoma) at Centre for Eye Health and is currently undertaking PhD studies in glaucoma and visual fields. He graduated from UNSW in 2011 and spent 3 years working in an independent private practice with a strong focus on ocular diseases. He became a Fellow of the American Academy of Optometry and completed a Masters in Public Health in 2014. He is also involved in undergraduate teaching at UNSW in the areas of ocular diseases, clinical optometry and ocular therapeutics.

Lecture Summary:

The optic nerve is one of the most prominent features seen on posterior eye examination. However, disc sizes and shapes that deviate from a typical appearance may confound assessment. This talk will provide a refresher on the anatomy of the optic nerve and a show a spectrum of atypical disc appearances that may range from the congenital or benign, to the sinister and pathological.

Learning Objectives:

  1. To understand the anatomy of the optic nerve and potential causes for atypical appearances on clinical examination
  2. To understand the strengths and weaknesses of various assessment techniques for atypical optic nerve configurations
  3. To be able to recognise a spectrum of optic nerve diagnoses ranging from benign to sinister
17/04/2018

Posterior Vitreous Detachment: The Rules of Traction LECTURE RUN

(Attendance at the live webinar will earn 2 face to face CPD points, and completion of the associated quiz will earn a further 1 face to face point.)

Paula Katalinic, BOptom (Hons), MOptom, GradCertOcTher, and Henrietta Wang, BOptom (Hons), BSc

Bios:

Paula received her BOptom and MOptom degrees from The University of New South Wales and gained her Graduate Certificate in Ocular Therapeutics in 2008. She has worked in both rural and urban optometric practice and spent 3.5 years at Joslin Diabetes Centre's Beetham Eye Institute in Boston. Most recently, she was a Staff Optometrist in the School of Optometry and Vision Science at The University of New South Wales and currently works part-time as the Professional Services Manager at Optometry Australia (NSW Division). Her clinical interests are in retinal pathology (with a particular interest in diabetic retinopathy) and colour vision.

Henrietta graduated from the University of New South Wales in 2016 with a Bachelor of Optometry (Hons) and Bachelor of Science. During her time at university, she undertook a summer vacation scholarship with the Retinal Networks Laboratory. She was the recipient of the Neville Fulthorpe Prize for Stage 5 Clinical Optometry and The Stage 5 Research Project Prize in 2016. She is currently also a clinical demonstrator for second year undergraduate students at the School of Optometry and Vision Science. Henrietta is involved in both the clinical and research aspects of CFEH.

Lecture Summary:

Undiagnosed retinal detachment, which often occurs secondary to PVD, is one of the most common reasons that optometrists in Australia face litigation.

Using a  case-based approach, this webinar will discuss the mechanism and natural course of PVD, consider risk factors for retinal detachment and other complications of PVD, and explore the benefits and limitations of both routine clinical techniques and advanced imaging when assessing a patient with new onset floaters or flashes.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Describe the natural course of posterior vitreous detachment
  2. Recognise vitreoretinal risk factors for retinal detachment including vitreoretinal tufts and lattice degeneration
  3. Understand the benefits and limitations of clinical assessment techniques and imaging in assessing patients with PVD
15/05/2018

The Role of Imaging in Monitoring AMD and Predicting Future Progression LECTURE RUN

(Attendance at the live webinar will earn 2 face to face CPD points, and completion of the associated quiz will earn a further 1 face to face point.)

Angelica Ly, BOptom (Hons), GradCertOcTher, (Senior Staff Optometrist, CFEH)

Bios:

Angelica is a Principal Staff Optometrist, Integrated Care Co-ordinator and PhD candidate at the Centre for Eye Health. She is a passionate and innovative clinician-scientist, with a special interest in collaborative care and posterior eye disease. Since joining the CFEH team in 2011, Angelica has been involved in the provision of cutting-edge clinical care using imaging technologies. She has a passion for evidence based optometry, early detection of ocular disease and clinical research. As well as presenting at ARVO and Australian based optometry conferences and events, she has also published a number of articles in Optometry and Vision Science, Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics, Clinical and Experimental Optometry and Pharma. Angelica also teaches in the optometry program at UNSW Sydney under a range of roles: ocular diseases lecturer and tutor, clinical supervisor, and research project supervisor.

Lecture Summary:

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common, complex and blinding eye disease. Early and intermediate stages are asymptomatic and presentations in one or both eyes pose a wide-ranging 0.4% to 53% risk of progression to advanced AMD in 5 years. In order to maximise visual outcomes, practising optometrists must be able to categorise patients according to their risk of progression, intervene and monitor accordingly. This lecture provides an overview of how to best detect progression in AMD. Applied imaging and a range of clinical cases will be used to describe the range of often overlooked signs that herald a negative prognosis in AMD and the value of identifying these lesions in a clinical setting.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Be able to apply the evidence base on imaging in AMD to better stratify, prognosticate and manage intermediate AMD cases
  2. Be able to identify and differentiate both established and emerging structural risk factors for progression in intermediate AMD
  3. Understand the limitations of the current evidence base regarding biomarkers in intermediate AMD
12/06/2018

Glaucoma Update: The Future of Glaucoma Management LECTURE RUN

(Attendance at the live webinar will earn 2T face to face CPD points, and completion of the associated quiz will earn a further 1T face to face point.)

Jessie Huang, BOptom (Hons), GradCertOcTher, and Dr Ashish Agar, MBBS, PhD, FRANZCO

Bios:

Jessie was awarded Bachelor of Optometry (Hons) and Graduate Certificate in Ocular Therapeutics by the University of New South Wales. Her work experience includes clinical practice and teaching in various locations across NSW and Victoria. Jessie spent 12 months in Vietnam volunteering as a university lecturer at a new optometry school. Upon returning to Sydney, she re-joined CFEH and is also undertaking her PhD in glaucoma management.

Dr Ashish Agar trained in ophthalmology at Prince of Wales Hospital. He obtained his fellowship in Glaucoma from Oxford and spent time at Moorfields Eye Hospital during 2006-2007. Dr Agar is engaged in research into Glaucoma pathogenesis and was awarded a PhD in this field. His other interests include rural ophthalmology as a visiting consultant in Broken Hill and Tamworth, and in Aboriginal medicine with the Fred Hollows Foundation in Moree. Dr Agar has also volunteered for aid work in Burma and India and is fluent in Hindi.

Lecture Summary:

This webinar will be presented in two parts.  CFEH Optometrist Jessie Huang will commence the webinar with an outline of the current understanding of the pathophysiology of glaucoma.  Following her introduction, glaucoma specialist Dr Ashish Agar will talk about the dramatic changes that are happening in glaucoma management from a surgeon's perspective. Five decades of conventional techniques are being transformed by technology. Minimally Invasive Glaucoma Surgery, or 'MIGS' as it's commonly called, is the new generation of glaucoma operation and Dr Agar will cover the historical development of this technology, and why this is significant. The various types of MIGS devices will be described and how they work, and what the current indications for their use are. MIGS are increasingly being used to control IOP once first line therapy, medications or laser, are no longer effective or tolerated.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Understand the pathophysiological basis of glaucoma.
  2. Understand the concept of MIGS, the stimulus for their development and be aware of the different devices and the various anatomical approaches they use.
  3. Know what to look for in a patient who has had MIGS surgery.
10/07/2018

Ocular Surface Inflammation LECTURE RUN

(Attendance at the live webinar will earn 2T face to face CPD points, and completion of the associated quiz will earn a further 1T face to face point.)

Professor Minas Coroneo, OA BSc (Med), MB BS, MSC SYD, MD, MS UNSW, FRACS, FRANZCO

Bios:

Professor Coroneo has wide-ranging clinical and research interests in the pathophysiology of ocular epithelia and has had a long-term involvement in studying the effects of sunlight on the eye (focusing on pterygium and cataract). Professor Coroneo has developed new technologies and ophthalmic devices and is the inventor of several patents. He introduced trypan blue (VisionBlue) as an ocular dye and is developing next generation intraocular lenses and glaucoma shunts (CyPass) as well as a bionic eye. He is committed teacher and has received prizes for his research and contribution to health care delivery. He coordinates one ofthe largest outreach programs in Australia and developed telemedicine systems. He has over 140 publications in peer-reviewed journals and is the author of a monograph on sunlight and the eye, which has been translated into nine languages. He was an international consultant for the American Academy of Ophthalmology (External Disease and Cornea) and is a member of the International Intraocular Implant Club. Professor Coroneo has held numerous appointments as part of Government decision-making bodies, on local and international advisory groups and within ophthalmic societies and organizations .

Lecture Summary:

Lecture summary goes here.

Learning Outcomes:

Learning outcomes go here.

14/08/2018

When OCT Alone Isn’t Enough LECTURE RUN

(Attendance at the live webinar will earn 2T face to face CPD points, and completion of the associated quiz will earn a further 1T face to face point.)

Michael Yapp, BOptoms (Hons), MOptom, GradCertOcTher, and Carol Chu, BOptom (Hons), GradCertOcTher

Bios:

Michael received has B.Optom (Hons), M.Optom and GradCertOcTher from UNSW. He has worked in private practice, as a locum in around Australia and the UK, as a staff optometrist at UNSW, as the program manager for Luxottica’s charity program and at a corneal specialist ophthalmology practice.He is currently Head of Clinical Operations and Teaching at the Centre for Eye Health with a special interest in ocular imaging and glaucoma. He is passionate about contributing to both undergraduate and postgraduate optometric education and has been invited to speak in India and the US as well as around Australia. He has also contributed to articles in Ophthalmic and Physiological optics, Ophthalmic Epidemiology, Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness and Pharma.

Carol received her Bachelor of Optometry and Graduate Certificate in Ocular Therapeutics from The University of New South Wales, also receiving the University Medal. She has worked in private and corporate optometric practices.

Lecture Summary:

OCT is fast becoming the standard of care for the diagnosis and management for many ocular conditions and diseases. There are however a significant number of clinical situations where the diagnosis and management is better made through the use of other structural as well as functional tests. This lecture will take a case-based approach to review the benefits of other currently available clinical tools and techniques including discussing the corresponding limitations of current OCT results.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Have an increased understanding  of the use of structural and functional testing for the differential diagnosis and management of ocular disease.
  2. Have a better understanding of the limitations of OCT use in the differential diagnosis of ocular disease.
  3. Have utilized a stepwise approach to the differential diagnosis of ocular signs and symptoms.
11/09/2018

Unravelling Abnormal Retinal Vasculature LECTURE RUN

(Attendance at the live webinar will earn 2T face to face CPD points, and completion of the associated quiz will earn a further 1T face to face point.)

Janelle Tong, B. Optom (Hons), B. Sci and Carol Chu, BOptom (Hons), GradCertOcTher

Bios:

Janelle graduated with a Bachelor of Optometry (Hons)/Bachelor of Science degree from UNSW Australia. She was the recipient of the University Medal and several other academic awards throughout her university career. Prior to joining CFEH, she worked in a full-scope private practice in Sydney, where she developed her interest in managing posterior ocular disease.

Carol received her Bachelor of Optometry and Graduate Certificate in Ocular Therapeutics from The University of New South Wales, also receiving the University Medal. She worked in private and corporate optometric practices before joining CFEH where she is a senior staff optometrist.

Lecture Summary:

Patients with changes to the retinal vasculature are frequently encountered in general optometric practice. Correct identification and appropriate management of these changes can afford patients significant benefits to not only their ocular health, but may also play a role in managing their systemic health.

This webinar will take a case-based approach to some of the retinal vasculature presentations more commonly seen in clinical practice and provide insight into the underlying systemic processes associated with these cases.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Identify abnormal retinal vascular signs, understand the basic pathophysiology behind these signs and recognise systemic conditions associated with these presentations.
  2. Discuss appropriate management strategies, including the role of systemic investigations.
  3. Discuss the potential role of multimodal imaging.
09/10/2018

Oral Medicines in Eyecare LECTURE RUN

(Attendance at the live webinar will earn 2T face to face CPD points, and completion of the associated quiz will earn a further 1T face to face point.)

Dr Alex Hui, PhD

Bios:

Dr Alex Hui was awarded his PhD by the University of Waterloo in Canada where he also completed his undergraduate studies. Dr Hui’s work centres around the development and testing of novel ways of treating ocular diseases. One key area of his research is looking at utilizing contact lenses as a means to deliver pharmaceuticals to the eye, including delivery of antibiotics, anti-allergy and anti-inflammatory agents. He is also interested in the development of other types of drug delivery systems for the treatment of infectious, inflammatory and allergic diseases of the eye, including development of novel eye drops and new biomaterials.

Lecture Summary:

In this presentation, common oral medications used in the management of ocular disease will be discussed with regard to their indications, contraindications, dosages, adverse effects and precautions. The pharmacological considerations of oral therapy for ocular conditions will be discussed. Examples of ocular conditions responsive to oral medication will be presented as well as evidence supporting oral management.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Become familiar with the indications, contraindications, dosages, adverse effects and precautions of commonly used oral medications for eye care
  2. Increase knowledge of ocular conditions which require oral therapy and evidence supporting use of this method of administration
  3. Have knowledge of the pharmacological considerations of oral medications for ocular disease.
06/11/2018

Top 10 CFEH Cases of 2018 LECTURE RUN

(Attendance at the live webinar will earn 2T face to face CPD points and completion of the associated quiz will earn a further 1T face to face point.)

Pauline Xu, BOptom (Hons), MOptom, GradCertOcTher, Lindsay Moore, BOptom (Hons), BSc, and Dr Michael Hennessey, BMedSc (UQld), MBBS (Hons 2, UQld), MBiomedE (UNSW), FRANZCO

Bios:

Pauline graduated from the Bachelor of Optometry degree at UNSW Australia with first class honours. She subsequently completed her graduate certificate of ocular therapeutics and Master of Optometry from UNSW. Following graduation Pauline practiced full-scope optometry in both rural and urban practices and spent 5 years in the Brien Holden Vision Institute, Sydney as research optometrist. Apart from working in CFEH, Pauline continues to work in private practices in Sydney and supervises optometry students in the School of Optometry and Vision Science at UNSW.

Lindsay graduated with a Bachelor of Optometry / Bachelor of Science degree from the University of New South Wales. She has worked as an optometrists at private practices in Sydney including assisting Ophthalmologists in their work ups, performing pre-assessment and recovery for patients before and after surgery.

Dr Michael Hennessy is a staff specialist ophthalmologist at the Eye Clinic at Prince of Wales Hospital (POWH) and also works in private practice. During his time at POWH, he has also been the Director of Ophthalmology registrar training and part of the management team for the eye clinic and the Outback Eye Service.  Dr Hennessy has had several roles in the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists (RANZCO). He has also devoted his efforts to the Ophthalmology Network of the Agency for Clinical Innovation (ACI-ON), leading the development of an improved pathway for the referral of patients with cataract to NSW public hospitals including a role for optometrists in the pathway. He has helped develop the relationship between POWH Ophthalmology and the Centre for Eye Health which has recently been expanded with the Shared Glaucoma Care clinic.

Lecture Summary:

Lecture summary goes here.

Learning Outcomes:

Learning outcomes go here.


About Learning for Vision

Learning for Vision continuing education material is produced by the Centre for Eye Health in Sydney. The educational resources are world-class, being used for optometrists in the United States, United Kingdom, Ireland and New Zealand.

The Learning for Vision 10 webinar program is always popular, offering up to date and topical presentations on ocular disease from both experienced CFEH optometrists and guest ophthalmology speakers. There is also an extensive catalogue of Interactive case studies, video lectures and literature reviews available: 2017 CPD Catalogue

Free resources available through Learning for Vision include Chairside reference materials and condition spotlight cases on topics of current interest: